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The Focus of Our Research

Our multidisciplinary work focuses on researching the structural determinants of economic mobility and promoting solutions that remove barriers to individual achievement, earned success and opportunity.

Our initial research will focus on the relationships between income mobility and entrepreneurship, occupational licensing, and the sharing economy. Future issues that we plan to target include business dynamism, rule of law, regulation, education, trade, monetary policy, property rights and character development.

To accomplish our research objectives, we are looking to fund new research and innovative approaches that tackle various gaps in public policy research on economic mobility and its structural indicators. To propose a paper, please send a one-page proposal with a title, timeline and description of research methodology to research@archbridgeinstitute.org.

In our currently polarized country, there seem to be very few things that can bring us together. The sense of tribalism in our culture and politics has been magnified by the Coronavirus pandemic—which many of us hoped might bring a sense of unity to the country in the fight against a common enemy.

Promoting Skills

Societies everywhere face the problems of poverty, inequality, and economic and social immobility. The severity of these problems differs by country. Governments everywhere, including those in the United States (U.S.), are enacting policies to alleviate them.
May 2020Clay Routledge Click here to open the PDF in a new Tab Social, behavioral, and health scientists are increasingly appreciating how important meaning in life is to both mental and...
February 2020 Edward Timmons, PhDConor Norris, MAKnee Center for the Study of Occupational RegulationSaint Francis University Click Here to Open the PDF in a New Tab Why Does...
In “Deserting Workers? Barriers to Work in New Mexico,” Dr. Edward Timmons and Conor Norris highlight how occupational licensing restrictions are holding back New Mexicans attempting to climb the income ladder. Building on previous research that tracked state-by-state growth in low- to moderate-income occupations requiring a license, the researchers also suggest solutions for policymakers looking to expand economic opportunities.
In the second part of our three-part primer on economic mobility in the US, this latest report by Dr. Scott Winship reassesses the cross-national evidence on intergenerational economic mobility, updates previous conclusions by reviewing more recent research and reevaluates the older literature. Dr. Winship challenges the conventional wisdom of upward mobility highlights previously neglected nuances in the literature that complicate the simple conclusion that the fates of American children are more tied to their family circumstances than is true of children in other countries.

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