The Archbridge Institute is a non-partisan, independent, 501(c)(3) public policy think tank. Our mission is to lift barriers to human flourishing.

Our Latest Research

Commentary

Inequality matters — but not in the way you think

To put it lightly, the issue of which income group pays more taxes is not easy to discern.

Reflections on Studying Human Flourishing and Progress: Shared Challenges and Shared Potential

The quest to live better and more meaningful lives and to provide a better life for future generations, especially our own children, is as strong a commonality as there exists in the world.

How Rent Control Threatens the American Dream

There is a very real shortage of affordable housing across America’s most dynamic areas, but rent control is an ineffective solution to this problem.

The Archbridge Institute Adds New Scholars to Board of Academic Advisers

The Archbridge Institute is delighted to announce that economists Tyler Cowen and Russ Roberts are joining the academic advisory board as its newest members. Cowen and Roberts...

American Originals

The Unsung Story of the Greatest Industrial Designer

Outside of the field of product and transportation design, too few people know who Raymond Loewy was. The best-known industrial designer, founder of the industrial design profession, and member of...

Gail Borden: Texas Pioneer, Quirky Visionary

Born in upstate New York in 1801, Gail Borden was raised there and in Kentucky and Indiana. As a young man, he moved to Mississippi and then...

Henry J. Kaiser: California Dreamer, Workers’ Friend

First building roads in Washington State, he soon helped build the western infrastructure, including Hoover Dam and Grand Coulee Dam. He played a key role in America’s victory in World War II by building hundreds of warships at an unprecedented pace. He also created aluminum and steel industries on the West Coast, doing more to bring manufacturing to California than anyone else.

James J Hill: Empire Builder without Peer

Jim Hill left poverty in rural Ontario after his father died when the son was only fourteen years old. He landed in St. Paul, Minnesota, where over the next fifty years he did more to shape the northwestern United States than any other single person. This is his story.

George Westinghouse: Servant Leader, Inventor, Captain of Industry

Like Thomas Edison, Westinghouse was a prolific inventor, but unlike Edison he successfully built and ran multiple great enterprises employing tens of thousands of workers. Those workers were treated better than at almost any other industrial employer of the era. His companies registered over one thousand patents. George Westinghouse always dreamed big and acted boldly, focused on the biggest issues in technology, attributes seen again today in dreamers like Elon Musk. This is his story.