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Dr. Scott Winship

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Scott Winship, Honorary Advisor to the Archbridge Institute, writes extensively on trends in economic mobility, producing long studies, shorter reports, and op-eds on the subject.

Economic Mobility in America

In the second part of our three-part primer on economic mobility in the US, this latest report by Dr. Scott Winship reassesses the cross-national evidence on intergenerational economic mobility, updates previous conclusions by reviewing more recent research and reevaluates the older literature. Dr. Winship challenges the conventional wisdom of upward mobility highlights previously neglected nuances in the literature that complicate the simple conclusion that the fates of American children are more tied to their family circumstances than is true of children in other countries.

Perceptions of Rising Opportunity Across Rich Nations and Over Time

Across the globe, people always seek more opportunity for themselves and for their children. The last several decades have seen a steady increase in living standards, particularly in wealthy nations—but has this translated into feelings of better opportunities for success than previous generations? To answer this question, and others related to attitudes regarding economic opportunity and mobility, Archbridge Institute Honorary Advisor Dr. Scott Winship analyzes poll results from rich nations and compares them to historical trends.

Social Mobility is Still Going Strong in the Land of Opportunity

So-called “declinists” argue that it’s harder to climb up the income ladder than it used to be. Archbridge Honorary Advisor Dr. Scott Winship reexamines the evidence, finding that the decline in the size of families has allowed Americans to be better off than their parents with less income. In National Review, Winship summarizes his research and its implications.

Economic Mobility in America, A Primer

Economic mobility has become a leading policy concern across the political spectrum in America. But “opportunity” and “mobility” are elusive concepts. Dr. Scott Winship provides an overview of the different ways of measuring both relative and absolute mobility (i.e., movement in ranks and movement in dollars). He distinguishes between mobility indicators that assess movement in different parts of the parental and child income distributions, as well as summary measures that describe how mobility does or does not reduce childhood inequalities.