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The Focus of Our Research

Our multidisciplinary work focuses on researching the structural determinants of economic mobility and promoting solutions that remove barriers to individual achievement, earned success and opportunity.

Our initial research will focus on the relationships between income mobility and entrepreneurship, occupational licensing, and the sharing economy. Future issues that we plan to target include business dynamism, rule of law, regulation, education, trade, monetary policy, property rights and character development.

To accomplish our research objectives, we are looking to fund new research and innovative approaches that tackle various gaps in public policy research on economic mobility and its structural indicators. To propose a paper, please send a one-page proposal with a title, timeline and description of research methodology to research@archbridgeinstitute.org.

Across the globe, people always seek more opportunity for themselves and for their children. The last several decades have seen a steady increase in living standards, particularly in wealthy nations—but has this translated into feelings of better opportunities for success than previous generations? To answer this question, and others related to attitudes regarding economic opportunity and mobility, Archbridge Institute Honorary Advisor Dr. Scott Winship analyzes poll results from rich nations and compares them to historical trends.
Economic mobility has become a leading policy concern across the political spectrum in America. But “opportunity” and “mobility” are elusive concepts. Dr. Scott Winship provides an overview of the different ways of measuring both relative and absolute mobility (i.e., movement in ranks and movement in dollars). He distinguishes between mobility indicators that assess movement in different parts of the parental and child income distributions, as well as summary measures that describe how mobility does or does not reduce childhood inequalities.
Gonzalo Schwarz, president and CEO of the Archbridge Institute, reviews the literature and examines recent studies on the importance of structural factors in understanding economic mobility. He finds that the analysis raises quite a few questions and notes that expanding the opportunity to climb the income ladder should be the main focus of the inequality and mobility debate.
In “Deserting Workers? Barriers to Work in New Mexico,” Dr. Edward Timmons and Conor Norris highlight how occupational licensing restrictions are holding back New Mexicans attempting to climb the income ladder. Building on previous research that tracked state-by-state growth in low- to moderate-income occupations requiring a license, the researchers also suggest solutions for policymakers looking to expand economic opportunities.
February 2020 Edward Timmons, PhDConor Norris, MAKnee Center for the Study of Occupational RegulationSaint Francis University Click Here to Open the PDF in a New Tab Why Does Occupational Licensing Matter in the Hawkeye State? As 2019 came to a close, the labor market...
Is occupational licensing preventing individuals from earning more than their parents? Professors Edward Timmons and Brian Meehan together with researchers Andrew Meehan and John Hazenstab take a closer look at this question to discover how recent increases in occupational licensing requirements are associated with economic mobility.

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