Is the American Dream dead for young Americans? Dr. Edward Timmons of Saint Francis University and coauthor of Barriers to Mobility, says there are good arguments that it may not be as bleak as it seems. Economists agree, however, that many poor children remain poor in adulthood. Timmons examines the growth of occupational licensing as a possible cause.
In a Wall Street Journal op-ed, Secretary of Labor Acosta and South Dakota Governor Daugaard outline their plan for interstate compacts that allow holders of an occupational license in one state to receive a temporary license for that occupation when moving to another state within the compact. Archbridge Director of Policy Research Ben Wilterdink explains why this does nothing to resolve the barriers to mobility caused by occupational licensing.
Archbridge Director of Programs Ben Wilterdink argues for the importance of soft skills in our increasingly service-based economy. With minimum wage increases and helicopter parenting becoming the norm, Wilterdink argues that children and young adults are missing opportunities to gain the soft skills that employers want in today’s labor market. INTERSTATE COMPACTS AREN’T THE RIGHT W
Archbridge Director of Programs Ben Wilterdink explains the difference between artificial and natural barriers that are preventing people from lifting themselves out of poverty. At the local level, many groups have seen this issue and implemented programs that are tailored to the specific needs of individuals with spectacular results.
The American Dream has been alive for Gonzalo Schwarz, Archbridge President and CEO, ever since he first thought of moving to the United States. But after immigrating, he found that more and more of his adopted countrymen have lost faith in the Dream. Examining recent evidence, Gonzalo assesses whether the American Dream is alive and well, fading, or nonexistent.
In an op-ed for The Hill, Director of Programs Ben Wilterdink explores one of the overlooked effects of rising minimum wages — reduced opportunities for teenagers and young adults to learn soft skills. Examining recent literature, Wilterdink finds that entry-level employment and soft skill accumulation are linked to long-term economic success.

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